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Author Topic: Salem Methodist Chapel Sticker Lane  (Read 3655 times)
bobbond
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« on: November 28, 2010, 11:10:17 AM »

I have attached a drawing of the chapel date 1981 but purported to be as it was in 1920, plus a couple of pictures captured from Google to show how it looks today.

This drawing was used on the invitation to my Uncl Bernard CAWTHRAY's Golden Wedding celebration which I scanned.  I don't know where the original came from.  Note the tower on the front appears to be missing today.

As it looks now, taken from Google Street View.


I remember going to Sunday school at the Chapel, which was the door to the rear, and later had the dubious honour of being thrown out, along with my brother.  We asked if we could play the organ at the end of the service, and we proceeded to play 'chop sticks', which clearly wasn't considered good methodist music lol.  If you want me to email the originals I can, just let me know.

Bob
« Last Edit: November 28, 2010, 01:38:00 PM by bobbond » Logged

Bob

"Everybody has to believe in something.....I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields
bobbond
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« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2010, 11:26:57 AM »

Found this short history taken from: Histories of Bolton and Bowling by William Cudworth
Link: http://www.archive.org/stream/historiesbolton00cudwgoog/historiesbolton00cudwgoog_djvu.txt

The founders of Salem Chapel and School, Sticker Lane, originally formed part of the Wesleyan Methodist Church at the Wesleyan Chapel, Dudley Hill, who seceded from there during the Reform movement in 1849-1850.  Becoming Wesleyan Reformers, they in the year 1855 erected the present Wesley Place Chapel, Dudley Hill.  In l860, however, the question of Church polity caused a secession, and a large majority decided to join the Methodist New Connexion denomination, and in 1861 built the Salem Chapel and School, which were opened in July and December of that year, at a cost of £1879.  In 1868, 1869, and 1873 alterations were made in the chapel, and an enlargement of the schools was made at a further cost of £1421, making a total cost of £3300.  The above includes a plot of land for further extension.  The ministerial supply is the Circuit Plan, of which Mannville, Horton Road, Bradford, is the head chapel.

Bob
« Last Edit: November 28, 2010, 01:36:55 PM by bobbond » Logged

Bob

"Everybody has to believe in something.....I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields
Salmac
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« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2010, 06:38:30 PM »

Wow Bob, you actually attended the chapel as a child? I find that fantastic! Sometimes family history is flat and this certainly brings it to life. This is the same building purchased in the deed I posted earlier?

Also its a reminder that family 'traditions' or behaviour can extend a long time.

Do you have an idea of when the earliest Methodism was in your family?
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bobbond
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« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2010, 07:47:57 PM »

I'm not sure, but I do know that my Gt Grandparents Alice BEARDER & Henry Herbert PARKIN were married there in 1896.  Both sets of Grandparents were married there in 1925 & 1927 then my parents in 1949.  In fact it was where they first met.  My guess was that they started going there when they migrated to that end of Bowling.  I do remember that each family had there own seat box. 

When I was a child we lived abroad, my father being in the oil industry, and my elder brother and I were sent back to the UK to boarding school.  We didn't go home during the Easter holidays and stayed with our Grandparents in Bradford.  We would be taken to Salem on Sundays, and because our parents weren't there, we were in a box on our own.  The rest of the family being in their own respective boxes.  Seemed rather strange, and everybody was looking at us, but we were treated as royalty, and greeted as long lost friends by everybody.  We just pretended we remembered them and smiled, lol.  Everybody seemed to be related in some way, either Aunts, Uncles, second cousins etc.  They used to be regular family get togethers.  It was on one of those trips, I would be about 8 or 9, when my brother asked if we could play the organ at the end of the service.  Of course they said yes, and we were led up to the front at the end of the service and allowed to play as everybody trooped out.  The look of horror when we began playing 'chop sticks' was hilarious.  Clearly not the dignified Handel/Bach etc they were expecting.  We were very promptly sent packing out of the door and gained a thick ear from our Grandfather Wear.  We were never really brought up as Methodists as we lived abroad, but they seemed a very proper lot and always dressed in all their finery and fur coats.  I can't remember the last time I attended, but it must have been in the late sixties or early seventies.  Seems such a long time ago now.

Funny what you remember about a place.  I must have been about 6 or so when I came out of the Sunday School door one Sunday evening, and tried to jump over the low wall in front of the church.  I tripped on the wall and fell flat on my face the other side.  I had a monster lump on my head from hitting the stone pavement.  I probably fractured my skull, but all I got was a lump of butter when we got back to Bowling Hall Road.  I think I probably would have got a thick ear for that as well, if there wasn’t so many people about.  Happy days.
I must try to find out where the Salem records are held.  It will make interesting reading.


Bob
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Bob

"Everybody has to believe in something.....I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields
suedhc
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« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2010, 09:50:05 PM »

Although I do not have a date, I have a note that in the deeds of Salem Methodist Chapel, Sticker Lane, Thomas Bearder and William Bearder are listed as trustees.  I have always assumed that these were brothers Thomas b 1817 and William b 1807.

Sue
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bobbond
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« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2010, 10:18:02 PM »

Given the dates I wonder if it wasn't the two brothers b 1817 & 1807, but possibly Thomas b 1817 & nephew William b 1832.  While I don't have a date it looks like William b 1807 died in 1860, which was a year before Salem was built.

Bob
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Bob

"Everybody has to believe in something.....I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields
Salmac
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« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2010, 10:33:32 PM »

The deed of trust was 1855. The text of John b 1783s will, leaving the deposition of goods to his sons heirs to the executor may infer that the death of his son William b 1807 was a recent thing, just a thought.
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bobbond
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« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2010, 11:32:01 PM »

Given the date you may be right.  I would guess Williams death would have been between 1855 and Feb 1861 when John wrote his will.  Maybe it was his death that prompted the will.  He made it nearly a month before he died, but was probably ill at the time. 

Bob
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Bob

"Everybody has to believe in something.....I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields
Salmac
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« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2010, 07:07:10 PM »

I have just been reviewing will copies I have and there is an interesting entry in the will of Harrison Bearder dated 24/2/1919 where a trustee was Bobs gtxX grandfather Henry Herbert Parkin along with Fred Marsden. He provides quite a large bequest to the Salem Methodist Chapel on the proviso that they "take steps to and forthwith do abolish the system of pew rents and seat rents in the said chapel". If not the money was to go the Bradford Royal Infirmary

Bob given your comments on seating I would assume that didnt happen!
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bobbond
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« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2010, 07:14:55 PM »

I would say it possibly did happen, but humans being creatures of habit they probably carried on using the pews, but without paying for them.  But I don't know that for certain, but from what I remember people did seem to have their 'own' per boxes.  I will ask my mum.

Bob
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Bob

"Everybody has to believe in something.....I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields
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